Does patient age and height of fall alone require trauma team activation?

John M. Adams, Jaroslaw W. Bilaniuk, Brian K. Siegel, Louis T. DiFazio, Robert S. Skerker, Patricio Grob, Mark D. Bobbin, Rolando H. Rolandelli, Zoltán H. Németh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Our American College of Surgeons Level I trauma center uses physiological data and injury patterns to identify fall patients at risk. We hypothesized that height of fall and patient age impacted injury severity and analyzed if they were significant predictors of the need for trauma team activation. Charts were reviewed from July 1, 2004, to June 30, 2007, for age; sex; Injury Severity Score (ISS); height of fall and admission to the intensive care unit, operating room, stepdown unit, floor; or death. Exclusion criteria were physiological, neurologic, or airway compromise and penetrating neck or torso injuries. ISS was used as a positive control. A total of 1865 fall patients were treated during the period of data collection, and 1348 patients were eliminated by exclusion criteria, leaving 517 patients for study. Although patient age did not correlate with the need for trauma team activation, there was a statistically significant association between age and admission to the hospital from the emergency room (P < 0.05; area under curve [AUC] = 0.713; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.656 to 0.770). Similarly, although the height of fall alone did not have a significant predictive value for the need of trauma team activation, there was a clear association of the height of fall with hospital admission (AUC = 0.589; 95% CI, 0.519 to 0.658). Patient age and height of fall alone are not criteria for trauma team activation in the absence of physiological, neurologic, or airway compromise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1201-1205
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume77
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Wounds and Injuries
Injury Severity Score
Nervous System
Area Under Curve
Confidence Intervals
Torso
Trauma Centers
Operating Rooms
Intensive Care Units
Hospital Emergency Service
Neck

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Adams, J. M., Bilaniuk, J. W., Siegel, B. K., DiFazio, L. T., Skerker, R. S., Grob, P., ... Németh, Z. H. (2011). Does patient age and height of fall alone require trauma team activation? American Surgeon, 77(9), 1201-1205.
Adams, John M. ; Bilaniuk, Jaroslaw W. ; Siegel, Brian K. ; DiFazio, Louis T. ; Skerker, Robert S. ; Grob, Patricio ; Bobbin, Mark D. ; Rolandelli, Rolando H. ; Németh, Zoltán H. / Does patient age and height of fall alone require trauma team activation?. In: American Surgeon. 2011 ; Vol. 77, No. 9. pp. 1201-1205.
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Adams, JM, Bilaniuk, JW, Siegel, BK, DiFazio, LT, Skerker, RS, Grob, P, Bobbin, MD, Rolandelli, RH & Németh, ZH 2011, 'Does patient age and height of fall alone require trauma team activation?', American Surgeon, vol. 77, no. 9, pp. 1201-1205.

Does patient age and height of fall alone require trauma team activation? / Adams, John M.; Bilaniuk, Jaroslaw W.; Siegel, Brian K.; DiFazio, Louis T.; Skerker, Robert S.; Grob, Patricio; Bobbin, Mark D.; Rolandelli, Rolando H.; Németh, Zoltán H.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 77, No. 9, 01.09.2011, p. 1201-1205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Adams JM, Bilaniuk JW, Siegel BK, DiFazio LT, Skerker RS, Grob P et al. Does patient age and height of fall alone require trauma team activation? American Surgeon. 2011 Sep 1;77(9):1201-1205.