Comparison of diagnostic specimens and methods to evaluate infected venous access ports

Eric Whitman, Anita Marie Boatman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Implanted venous access port infection can be difficult to diagnose and treat. If device removal is necessary, confirming port infection is problematic. Materials and methods: Culture specimens from three sites, catheter tip (Tip), port pocket, and the material within the reservoir (inside), were sent from ports removed for potential infection. The results of these cultures were compared to preremoval peripheral and central blood cultures. Results: Forty-five ports were removed for suspected infection. Confirmed port infection was defined as positive culture(s) from one or more experimental specimen(s). In 29 evaluable cases, the inside specimens were completely predictive. Tip specimens were less accurate, even with a lower diagnostic threshold. In 7 of 19 confirmed infections, only the inside culture was diagnostic. Conclusion: The most predictive culture specimen in a potentially infected port is the thrombotic material inside the reservoir.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)665-670
Number of pages6
JournalThe American Journal of Surgery
Volume170
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Infection
Device Removal
Catheters

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

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Comparison of diagnostic specimens and methods to evaluate infected venous access ports. / Whitman, Eric; Boatman, Anita Marie.

In: The American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 170, No. 6, 01.01.1995, p. 665-670.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Background: Implanted venous access port infection can be difficult to diagnose and treat. If device removal is necessary, confirming port infection is problematic. Materials and methods: Culture specimens from three sites, catheter tip (Tip), port pocket, and the material within the reservoir (inside), were sent from ports removed for potential infection. The results of these cultures were compared to preremoval peripheral and central blood cultures. Results: Forty-five ports were removed for suspected infection. Confirmed port infection was defined as positive culture(s) from one or more experimental specimen(s). In 29 evaluable cases, the inside specimens were completely predictive. Tip specimens were less accurate, even with a lower diagnostic threshold. In 7 of 19 confirmed infections, only the inside culture was diagnostic. Conclusion: The most predictive culture specimen in a potentially infected port is the thrombotic material inside the reservoir.

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