Central nervous system Lyme disease

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nervous system infection with Borrelia burgdorferi frequently causes meningitis and rarely causes encephalomyelitis. Altered cognitive function also can occur in the absence of central nervous system infection. Recently developed serodiagnostic tools, such as the C6 assay, and appropriate use of Western blotting, promise to improve diagnostic accuracy. Treatment trials have demonstrated the efficacy of relatively brief courses of oral antimicrobial agents, even in peripheral nervous system infection and meningitis. Several well-performed studies have clearly shown that prolonged antimicrobial treatment of "post-Lyme disease" is ineffective. Diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease continue to improve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)298-304
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Infectious Disease Reports
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Lyme Neuroborreliosis
Lyme Disease
Meningitis
Encephalomyelitis
Central Nervous System Infections
Borrelia burgdorferi
Peripheral Nervous System
Anti-Infective Agents
Infection
Cognition
Nervous System
Western Blotting

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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abstract = "Nervous system infection with Borrelia burgdorferi frequently causes meningitis and rarely causes encephalomyelitis. Altered cognitive function also can occur in the absence of central nervous system infection. Recently developed serodiagnostic tools, such as the C6 assay, and appropriate use of Western blotting, promise to improve diagnostic accuracy. Treatment trials have demonstrated the efficacy of relatively brief courses of oral antimicrobial agents, even in peripheral nervous system infection and meningitis. Several well-performed studies have clearly shown that prolonged antimicrobial treatment of {"}post-Lyme disease{"} is ineffective. Diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease continue to improve.",
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Central nervous system Lyme disease. / Halperin, John.

In: Current Infectious Disease Reports, Vol. 6, No. 4, 01.01.2004, p. 298-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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