Carpal tunnel syndrome in Lyme borreliosis

John J. Halperin, David J. Volkman, Benjamin J. Luft, Raymond J. Dattwyler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neurophysiologic evidence of median nerve entrapment in the carpal tunnel was present in 25% of patients with late Lyme borreliosis. Sixty‐eight of 76 consecutive, prospectively studied patients with late Lyme underwent neurophysiologic testing. Nineteen reported intermittent hand paresthesias; 17 had neurophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome. This was not consistently associated with clinically apparent wrist arthritis or with neurophysiologically evident peripheral neuropathy. We conclude that a significant proportion of patients with late Lyme borreliosis develop carpal tunnel syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)397-400
Number of pages4
JournalMuscle & Nerve
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1989

Fingerprint

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Lyme Disease
Wrist
Nerve Compression Syndromes
Paresthesia
Median Nerve
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Arthritis
Hand

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Halperin, J. J., Volkman, D. J., Luft, B. J., & Dattwyler, R. J. (1989). Carpal tunnel syndrome in Lyme borreliosis. Muscle & Nerve, 12(5), 397-400. https://doi.org/10.1002/mus.880120510
Halperin, John J. ; Volkman, David J. ; Luft, Benjamin J. ; Dattwyler, Raymond J. / Carpal tunnel syndrome in Lyme borreliosis. In: Muscle & Nerve. 1989 ; Vol. 12, No. 5. pp. 397-400.
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Halperin, JJ, Volkman, DJ, Luft, BJ & Dattwyler, RJ 1989, 'Carpal tunnel syndrome in Lyme borreliosis', Muscle & Nerve, vol. 12, no. 5, pp. 397-400. https://doi.org/10.1002/mus.880120510

Carpal tunnel syndrome in Lyme borreliosis. / Halperin, John J.; Volkman, David J.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Dattwyler, Raymond J.

In: Muscle & Nerve, Vol. 12, No. 5, 05.1989, p. 397-400.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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