Bronchiectasis

The changing clinical scenario

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bronchiectasis, a progressive disease of the major bronchi and bronchioles, is characterized by dilation and destruction of the airways. This entity has recently resurged, particularly in the setting of tuberculosis and immunosuppression. Patients frequently present with productive cough, fever, hemoptysis, and dyspnea. While the diagnosis of bronchiectasis is strongly supported by clinical evidence, radiographic confirmation is needed. High-resolution CT is now the diagnostic gold standard. Antimicrobial therapy is a mainstay in the treatment of bronchiectasis. Inhaled antibiotics have been an effective option in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and may hold promise for bronchiectasis that is unrelated to CF. Other therapies include inhaled bronchodilators, anti-inflammatory therapy, chest physiotherapy, and the induction of airway oscillations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)666-681
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Respiratory Diseases
Volume21
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bronchiectasis
Cystic Fibrosis
Bronchioles
Hemoptysis
Bronchodilator Agents
Bronchi
Therapeutics
Cough
Dyspnea
Immunosuppression
Dilatation
Tuberculosis
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Fever
Thorax
Anti-Bacterial Agents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Bronchiectasis: The changing clinical scenario",
abstract = "Bronchiectasis, a progressive disease of the major bronchi and bronchioles, is characterized by dilation and destruction of the airways. This entity has recently resurged, particularly in the setting of tuberculosis and immunosuppression. Patients frequently present with productive cough, fever, hemoptysis, and dyspnea. While the diagnosis of bronchiectasis is strongly supported by clinical evidence, radiographic confirmation is needed. High-resolution CT is now the diagnostic gold standard. Antimicrobial therapy is a mainstay in the treatment of bronchiectasis. Inhaled antibiotics have been an effective option in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and may hold promise for bronchiectasis that is unrelated to CF. Other therapies include inhaled bronchodilators, anti-inflammatory therapy, chest physiotherapy, and the induction of airway oscillations.",
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Bronchiectasis : The changing clinical scenario. / Fiel, Stanley.

In: Journal of Respiratory Diseases, Vol. 21, No. 11, 01.01.2000, p. 666-681.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AB - Bronchiectasis, a progressive disease of the major bronchi and bronchioles, is characterized by dilation and destruction of the airways. This entity has recently resurged, particularly in the setting of tuberculosis and immunosuppression. Patients frequently present with productive cough, fever, hemoptysis, and dyspnea. While the diagnosis of bronchiectasis is strongly supported by clinical evidence, radiographic confirmation is needed. High-resolution CT is now the diagnostic gold standard. Antimicrobial therapy is a mainstay in the treatment of bronchiectasis. Inhaled antibiotics have been an effective option in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and may hold promise for bronchiectasis that is unrelated to CF. Other therapies include inhaled bronchodilators, anti-inflammatory therapy, chest physiotherapy, and the induction of airway oscillations.

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