Brachial artery laceration with closed posterior elbow dislocation in an eight year old

M. Manouel, B. Minkowitz, G. Shimotsu, I. Haq, J. Feliccia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Elbow dislocations are relatively uncommon in children. Rupture of the brachial artery associated with closed elbow dislocations in children is rare. This is a report of an 8-year-old boy, the youngest patient ever to be reported to have a closed posterior dislocation of the elbow associated with a brachial artery laceration. The boy incurred a closed elbow dislocation after a fall onto his outstretched arm. On physical examination, both radial and ulnar (ulnar) pulses were absent. Radiographs showed a posterolateral dislocation of the right elbow and distal fractures of the radius and ulna. Operative exploration of the antecubital fossa showed complete transection of the brachial artery. Repair of the vessel was performed using an interposition vein graft. The distal forearm fractures were managed by closed reduction. At the two-year postoperative follow-up examination, the patient had a normal neurovascular examination with full range of motion of his elbow and wrist. Surgical treatment should include exploration of the antecubital fossa and reconstruction of the injured vessels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-112
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Issue number296
StatePublished - Nov 17 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Brachial Artery
Lacerations
Elbow
Ulna Fractures
Radius Fractures
Articular Range of Motion
Wrist
Forearm
Physical Examination
Rupture
Veins
Arm
Transplants

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

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Brachial artery laceration with closed posterior elbow dislocation in an eight year old. / Manouel, M.; Minkowitz, B.; Shimotsu, G.; Haq, I.; Feliccia, J.

In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, No. 296, 17.11.1993, p. 109-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Manouel, M.

AU - Minkowitz, B.

AU - Shimotsu, G.

AU - Haq, I.

AU - Feliccia, J.

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AB - Elbow dislocations are relatively uncommon in children. Rupture of the brachial artery associated with closed elbow dislocations in children is rare. This is a report of an 8-year-old boy, the youngest patient ever to be reported to have a closed posterior dislocation of the elbow associated with a brachial artery laceration. The boy incurred a closed elbow dislocation after a fall onto his outstretched arm. On physical examination, both radial and ulnar (ulnar) pulses were absent. Radiographs showed a posterolateral dislocation of the right elbow and distal fractures of the radius and ulna. Operative exploration of the antecubital fossa showed complete transection of the brachial artery. Repair of the vessel was performed using an interposition vein graft. The distal forearm fractures were managed by closed reduction. At the two-year postoperative follow-up examination, the patient had a normal neurovascular examination with full range of motion of his elbow and wrist. Surgical treatment should include exploration of the antecubital fossa and reconstruction of the injured vessels.

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