Abnormalities of the nervous system in lyme disease

Response to antimicrobial therapy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective measures of neurologic function were used to assess response to treatment in patients with late Lyme borreliosis. Neurophysiologic evidence of peripheral neuropathy was present in 64 of 137 patients tested. Measures of distal axon function (sensory amplitude and conduction velocity, motor terminal latency) were most affected. Repeat studies following 60 patients receiving antimicrobial therapy demonstrated significant improvement in these values. Before and after therapy 17 patients with late Lyme borreliosis and prominent subjective cognitive dysfunction underwent neuropsychologic tests of memory, conceptual ability, concentration, psychomotor function, overlearned intellectual abilities, and mood. Significant abnormalities wereevident before treatment; all reversed with antimicrobial therapy. Many patients with this encephalopathy had specific abnormalities revealed by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and had evidence of intrathecal synthesis of antibody to Borrelia. These findings indicate that late Lyme borreliosis commonly causes nervous system abnormalities that are reversible with appropriate antibiotic therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S1499-S1504
JournalReviews of Infectious Diseases
Volume11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lyme Neuroborreliosis
Lyme Disease
Aptitude
Therapeutics
Nervous System Malformations
Borrelia
Neuropsychological Tests
Brain Diseases
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System
Axons
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Antibodies
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective measures of neurologic function were used to assess response to treatment in patients with late Lyme borreliosis. Neurophysiologic evidence of peripheral neuropathy was present in 64 of 137 patients tested. Measures of distal axon function (sensory amplitude and conduction velocity, motor terminal latency) were most affected. Repeat studies following 60 patients receiving antimicrobial therapy demonstrated significant improvement in these values. Before and after therapy 17 patients with late Lyme borreliosis and prominent subjective cognitive dysfunction underwent neuropsychologic tests of memory, conceptual ability, concentration, psychomotor function, overlearned intellectual abilities, and mood. Significant abnormalities wereevident before treatment; all reversed with antimicrobial therapy. Many patients with this encephalopathy had specific abnormalities revealed by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and had evidence of intrathecal synthesis of antibody to Borrelia. These findings indicate that late Lyme borreliosis commonly causes nervous system abnormalities that are reversible with appropriate antibiotic therapy.",
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Abnormalities of the nervous system in lyme disease : Response to antimicrobial therapy. / Halperin, John.

In: Reviews of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 11, 01.01.1989, p. S1499-S1504.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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