A new echocardiographic model for quantifying three-dimensional endocardial surface area

David E. Guyer, Thomas C. Gibson, Linda D. Gillam, Mary Etta King, Gerard T. Wilkins, J. Luis Guerrero, Arthur E. Weyman

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A new technique for quantitatively mapping the three-dimensional left ventricular endocardial surface was developed, using measurements from standard cross-sectional echocardiographic images. To validate the accuracy of this echocardiographic mapping technique in an animal model, the endocardial areas of 15 excised canine ventricles were calculated using measurements made from echocardiographic studies of the hearts and compared with areas determined with latex casts of the same ventricles. Close correlation (r = 0.87, p < 0.001) between these two measures of endocardial area provided preliminary confirmation of the accuracy of the maps. To further characterize the mapping algorithm, it was translated into computer format and used to map the surfaces of idealized hemiellipsoids. Areas measured with this mapping technique closely approximated the actual areas of idealized surfaces with a wide spectrum of shapes; maps were particularly accurate for ellipsoids with shapes similar to those of undistorted human ventricles. Also, the accuracies of area calculations were relatively insensitive to deviation from the assumed positions of the echocardiographic short-axis planes. Finally, although the accuracy of the mapping technique improved as data from more transverse planes were added, the procedure proved reliable for estimating surface areas when data from only three planes were used. These studies confirm the accuracy of the echocardiographic mapping technique, and they suggest that the resulting planar plots might be useful as templates for localizing and quantifying the overall extent of abnormal wall motion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)819-829
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

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Latex
Canidae
Animal Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Guyer, David E. ; Gibson, Thomas C. ; Gillam, Linda D. ; King, Mary Etta ; Wilkins, Gerard T. ; Luis Guerrero, J. ; Weyman, Arthur E. / A new echocardiographic model for quantifying three-dimensional endocardial surface area. In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 1986 ; Vol. 8, No. 4. pp. 819-829.
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A new echocardiographic model for quantifying three-dimensional endocardial surface area. / Guyer, David E.; Gibson, Thomas C.; Gillam, Linda D.; King, Mary Etta; Wilkins, Gerard T.; Luis Guerrero, J.; Weyman, Arthur E.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 8, No. 4, 01.01.1986, p. 819-829.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

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AU - Guyer, David E.

AU - Gibson, Thomas C.

AU - Gillam, Linda D.

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AU - Luis Guerrero, J.

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